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In-pharmacy vaccinations for measles, mumps, rubella, whooping cough, meningococcal, pneumococcal, shingles, chickenpox, polio, and HPV*.

 

*Ask your local Pharmacy 777 Pharmacist regarding other vaccinations that may be available in your state.



 

Eligible individuals can get vaccinated against illnesses such as whooping cough, measles, human papillomavirus, pneumococcal disease, shingles, chickenpox, polio, and meningococcal disease at their local pharmacy by trained pharmacists.


This initiative has been driven by the Department of Health to increase immunisation rates in the community by improving access to pharmacy-administered vaccines across the nation.

The vaccines that pharmacists can administer include but may not be limited to:

  • Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR);
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (whooping cough) dTpa; and
  • Meningococcal ACWY and B
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Pneumococcal
  • Herpes Zoster (Shingles)
  • Varicella Zoster (Chickenpox)
  • Poliomyelitis

All vaccinations provided will be recorded on the Australian Immunisation Register.
 



What is the NIP?

The National Immunisation Program (NIP) Schedule is a series of immunisations given at specific times throughout your life. The immunisations range from birth through to adulthood.

To ensure best protection, it is important the immunisations are at the specific age ranges. The vaccines within the schedule are free to patients and can be viewed here.

Contact your local Pharmacy 777 to discuss NIP and individual state eligibility.

 


Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (dTpa) vaccine?

The three-in-one vaccine provides immunity to diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (“whooping cough”) diseases.

Diphtheria is an acute bacterial (Corynebacterium diphtheriae) infection that can produce a thick membrane in the pharynx, causing severe breathing difficulties and potentially life- threatening conditions such as heart failure and nerve damage.

Tetanus is caused by a bacterium found in soil that can enter wounds and produce a neurotoxin that acts on the central nervous system to cause muscle rigidity with painful spasms. Tetanus-toxoid vaccines prevent disease by making antibodies that bind to the toxin, rather than the bacteria.

Pertussis, commonly known as ‘whooping cough’, is a highly contagious infection of the respiratory tract caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. It can be spread to other people by droplets from coughing or sneezing. Untreated, a person with whooping cough can spread it to other people for up to 3 weeks after the onset of cough.

The dTpa (diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough) vaccine is recommended for anyone who wishes to protect themselves against these diseases. Booster doses should be received every 10 years.
 

Who can receive diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (dTpa) vaccines from the pharmacy?

  • It is particularly important for healthcare workers and anyone who will be having contact with newborn babies to ensure that they receive the booster vaccine against whooping cough. This includes partners of pregnant women, grandparents, extended family and friends.
  • Pregnant women during each pregnancy, ideally at 20-32 weeks gestation but it can be received any time in the third trimester. This vaccine is free for pregnant women from their GP or maternity service.
  • Infants and children less than 10 years of age who have not received or missed a diphtheria-toxoid vaccines at the recommended schedule points may need extra doses of vaccines and/or alternative schedule.
  • Year 7 (or age equivalent) adolescent from 11 to 13 years of age who have missed their booster vaccination through their usual School-Based Immunisation Program (SBIP).
  • People over the age of 5 who have missed doses of childhood dTpa vaccines or routine booster vaccinations in adults, such as people exposed to tetanus-prone wound or travellers to countries where health services are difficult to access.


Contact your local Pharmacy 777 to discuss if you met the NIP or your individual state eligibility.

For vaccinations in WA:

BOOK DTPA VACCINE

 

For vaccinations in NSW, QLD, SA and VIC:

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL PHARMACY 777



Measles-mumps-rubella (MMR)

The three-in-one vaccine provides immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella diseases.

Measles is a highly infectious viral illness that causes a skin rash and fever and can lead to serious and potentially life-threatening complications. It is transmitted through a cough or sneeze from an infectious person, nose, or throat secretion, and by touching contaminated surfaces and objects.

Mumps is a highly contagious viral illness that causes fever and swollen salivary glands. Serious and potentially lethal complications include inflammation of the brain (encephalitis) or heart muscle (myocarditis).

Rubella, previously known as “German measles”, is a viral illness that causes a skin rash and joint pain. A rubella infection is mild for most people, but it can have catastrophic consequences for an unborn baby. If a pregnant woman contracts rubella, her baby is at risk of severe and permanent birth defects or death.
 

Who can receive the MMR vaccine from the pharmacy?

  • Anyone born during or since 1966 that does not have documentation of two doses of measles vaccine, particularly young adult travellers who may be visiting countries where measles continues to circulate, such as most countries in Asia and many in Europe.
  • People aged 5 years and over who are missing or have negative serological evidence of immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella.


Contact your local Pharmacy 777 to discuss if you met the NIP or your individual state eligibility.

For MMR vaccinations:

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL PHARMACY 777

 


Meningococcal A, B, C, W, Y

Meningococcal disease is caused by a bacterium, Neisseria meningitidis. Although difficult to spread, if infected, these infections can develop quickly and can cause serious illness or death. Meningococcal disease usually takes the form of a blood infection (septicaemia) or an infection of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord (meningitis).

Meningococcal vaccines are available to protect against disease strains A, B, C, W and Y.
 

Who can receive a meningococcal ACWY vaccine from the pharmacy?

  • Year 10 (or age equivalent) adolescents from 14 to 16 years who have missed vaccination through their usual School-Based Immunisation Program (SBIP).
  • All people, including refugees and humanitarian entrants, less than 20 years of age who have missed their childhood vaccine.
  • Adolescents and young adults that have missed their childhood vaccinations, special risk groups, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, individuals with certain medical conditions (such as people with asplenia, hyposplenia, complement deficiency and treatment with Eculizumab). Laboratory workers who frequently handle Neisseria, meningitidis, travellers, and young adults who live in close quarters or who are current smokers.

Who can receive a meningococcal B vaccine from the pharmacy?

  • All people with asplenia, hyposplenia, complement deficiency and treatment with Eculizumab.

Contact your local Pharmacy 777 to discuss if you met the NIP or your individual state eligibility.

For Meningococcal vaccinations:

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL PHARMACY 777



Human papillomavirus (HPV) 

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a very common virus that is spread through sexual contact. HPV can affect anyone who is or has been sexually active, even if they have only experienced sexual contact once. It is very common to be infected with one or more types of HPV shortly after sexual activity starts.

Most people do not experience any symptoms of HPV and the virus often goes away by itself. However, for some people HPV causes genital warts or cancer.

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine helps prevent infection with HPV that causes cervical cancer.
 

Who can receive an HPV vaccine from the pharmacy?

  • Adolescents and young adults from 9 years to 25 years of age (optimal age for HPV vaccinations is around 12 to 13 years of age prior to exposure to HPV).
  • Year 7 (or age equivalent) adolescents from 12 to 13 years who have missed vaccination through their usual School-Based Immunisation Program (SBIP).
  • Catch up for adult refugees and humanitarian entrants 20 years or over who have missed their childhood vaccines.
  • Adults aged 26 and over who are likely to have previous exposure to HPV or are at an increased future risks of HPV exposure and HPV.


Contact your local Pharmacy 777 to discuss if you met the NIP or your individual state eligibility.

For HPV vaccinations:

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL PHARMACY 777

 


Varicella (chickenpox)

Varicella, or commonly known as chickenpox, is a highly contagious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus characterised by an itchy, blister-like rash.  

It usually causes mild illness but can reappear later in life as shingles. Anyone who has not had chickenpox or who has not been vaccinated against chickenpox is at risk of infection. 

Who can receive a chickenpox vaccine from the pharmacy?  

  • children aged 12 months to <14 years* are recommended to receive a second dose after the first dose at 18 months. 
  • adolescents aged ≥14 years who have not received 2 doses of varicella-containing vaccine, particularly:
    • healthcare workers
    • childhood educators and carers
    • people who work in long-term care facilities 

 
Contact your local Pharmacy 777 to discuss if you met the NIP or your individual state eligibility. 

 

For Varicella vaccinations: 

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL PHARMACY 777


Poliomyelitis 

Poliomyelitis, or polio, is a serious disease caused by infection transmitted from person to person, mainly via water, food or hands contaminated with faeces or throat secretions of an infected person.   

The virus is live for 6 weeks and the infected person may not show any symptoms but can still spread the virus. However, in some rare cases, the virus may cause life threatening complications such as permanent paralysis of the arms, legs, or breathing muscles.  
 

Who can receive a polio vaccine from the pharmacy?  

  • Adolescents and adults who have not received polio-containing vaccine at the recommended schedule or not receive the polio vaccine as part of their childhood vaccination.   
  • People with higher risk of exposure to polio are recommended to receive a booster vaccinations every 10 years such as healthcare and laboratory workers, and travellers to polio endemic or epidemic areas and/or countries.  

 

Contact your local Pharmacy 777 to discuss if you met the NIP or your individual state eligibility. 

For Polio vaccinations: 

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL PHARMACY 777


Pneumococcal disease

Pneumococcal disease is caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, also known as pneumococcus. The disease is primarily spread through respiratory droplets, or direct contacts with respiratory secretions or contaminated surfaces.  

The bacterium can cause a range of illnesses, including pneumonia, meningitis, sepsis (blood stream infection), and other respiratory infections.  
 

Who can receive a pneumococcal vaccine from the pharmacy?  

  • First Nation Adults ≥50 years of age and Non-Indigenous adults ≥70 years of age without risk conditions for pneumococcal disease
  • First Nation children <5 years living in certain states and territories.*
  • People aged >12 months with certain risk conditions for pneumococcal disease.* 


Contact your local Pharmacy 777 to discuss if you met the NIP or your individual state eligibility. 

For pneumococcal vaccinations:

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL PHARMACY 777


Can a 16-year-old consent to vaccination?

Yes however, the Pharmacist can only administer the vaccine if they are certain the person understands what they are consenting to.
The Pharmacist must perform a pre-vaccination assessment before administering any vaccine.

 

Is it my responsibility to tell my GP I have received a vaccine from a Pharmacist?

No. Authorised Pharmacists are required to report all vaccinations events to the Australian Immunisation Register (AIR). The AIR is a national register that records the vaccination events of all people of all ages and information in the Register is accessible by authorised health professionals such as GPs, nurse immunisers and authorised Pharmacists, as well as by individuals for their own records and those of their children.


 

Check with your Pharmacist if this service and vaccines are available at your local 777:

EMAIL YOUR PHARMACIST